Montreal Bonsai Bus Trip

6P4A2536

Every few years our Bonsai Society of Upstate New York takes a bus trip to expose our members to interesting bonsai collections. In the past we have visited Canada (Montreal Botanical Garden and David Easterbrook); Washington, D.C. (National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Kennett Collection and Sean Smith); and Boston (Arnold Arboretum, Suthin, Bonsai West and New England Bonsai Garden).

GARDEN 9

GARDEN 8

GARDEN 4

On July 18, 19, 2015 our group of 22 members and friends revisited Canada to once again see the bonsai collections at the Montreal Botanical Garden, David Easterbrook and Serge Rubidoux. On the way home we visited Pauline Muth’s bonsai studio.

GARDEN 3

We were fortunate to have Eric Auger, Curator of the Japanese, North American and Tropical Bonsai Collections guide us around and answered all questions. He first took to areas not open to the public to see bonsai which were not on display, his workroom and overwintering greenhouses. Since the Chinese Penjing Collection was closed he showed us through the Tropical Bonsai Greenhouse. The entire botanical garden was beautiful, especially with the colorful flowers.

6P4A2516

GARDEN 5 GARDEN 6 GARDEN 7

GARDEN 2

After moving all of us with golf carts Eric showed us the Japanese Bonsai Collection and many members also strolled through the Japanese garden. There have been several significant bonsai donated by Susumu Nakamura, the Nippon Bonsai Association, City of Tokyo, Government of Japan and others, which included some magnificent specimens. Our members quickly recognized several of the bonsai, which the Montreal Botanical Garden displayed in the past four U.S. National Bonsai Exhibitions.

GARDEN 10

GARDEN 1

GARDEN 14 GARDEN 13 GARDEN 12 GARDEN 11

GARDEN 32

6P4A2555

After another short golf cart trip we went to the North American Bonsai Collection, which had some large and stunning bonsai from several different artists. George LeBolt from New Jersey donated a large number of his finest bonsai, as well as David Easterbrook and Nick Lenz.

GARDEN 16 GARDEN 17 GARDEN 18 GARDEN 19

6P4A2569

GARDEN 20 GARDEN 21

GARDEN 30 GARDEN 31

We then checked into our hotel across the street from the Montreal Botanical Garden and had a “delightful” evening at a Brazilian restaurant. Fortunately, the lighting was dim and a few of our members were enticed to join the dancers, so the photos did not come out well. But, if you look on Face Book, you might recognize a couple of us.

SERGE SERVE 1 SERVE 3

SERGE 4

SERVE 5

The next morning our private bus took us to visit the collection of architect Serge Robidoux. His garden was exquisite, not a blade of grass was out of place. Around the perimeter Serge had his bonsai displayed on multi level benches as well as monkey poles. A small water feature in the center of the yard created a peaceful focal point surrounded by many bonsai he has collected from the Canadian wilds over the past twenty years. Although there were some cultivated bonsai, the collected Larch and Pines were superb. Hopefully a few will be displayed in the next U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition.

DAVID DAVID 6  DAVID 3 DAVID 2

After another bus ride we arrived at the new home of David Easterbrook. The new large five acre property was spacious and David explained his plans on designing his new bonsai garden. He had recently moved 34 truckloads of bonsai, plants, containers, display tables, cement blocks, boards, greenhouse heating equipment and more. The temporary set up in his driveway housed his evergreens and larch, while in the dappled shade across a fence, on the grass, housed his deciduous bonsai. It is extremely difficult and quite time consuming to move an entire bonsai garden, but with a few friends, David finally had all his bonsai in his new garden. He explained his plans for a 100 x 35’ greenhouse for overwintering and two level bonsai studio complete with a mezzanine for container display. Although David was not set up to show his bonsai, we were fortunate to allow us to visit. But, we all look forward to returning in a few years to a superb bonsai garden and studio.

DAVID 1

David’s partner, Celine, surprised us and served all 22 of us a delicious luncheon, which took her a few days to prepare. She is called the “Martha Stewart of Canada,” an honor well deserved. We all sat near the pool enjoying our visit with David and Celine.

DAVID 4

On the way home to Rochester, New York, through the rain we stopped by the studio of Pauline Muth in West Charlton, New York. We quickly entered her beautiful modern studio, complete with a wine cooler, through the rain. Suddenly all our cell phones had a flood watch warning, then a tornado warning. The containers and supplies were inside so a few were purchased by our members. After a while the rain let up and members went outside to see her bonsai. On the way home we enjoyed a beautiful sun setting over western New York. Our thanks to Marc Arpag who arranged all our visits and our generous hosts, Eric, Serge, David, Celine and Pauline.

GROUP

A Summer Bonsai Display

HYDRANGEA DISPLAY 1

In May 2014 I was picking up Pro-Mix at a feed store and looked around in their nursery yard. I was not looking for anything in particular, just looking, and my eye was caught by a couple of new hydrangeas. Note I was looking at shapes, not species. Two specimens had beautiful natural untouched cascade shapes and I purchased the most interesting plant.

HYDRFANGEA

HYDRANGEA FLOWER 2

HYDRANGEA FLOWER

The new plant, Great Star Panicle hydrangea, Hydrangea paniculata ‘Le Vasterival,’ was growing in a two gallon can. After purchasing the Hydrangea it was potted in an expensive Japanese container and shaped into a cascade style bonsai.

Only a few branches were pruned and a couple pulled down with guy wires. I designed the bonsai so it could be viewed from several sides. This spring a larger container was required and the bonsai was planted in an old blue glazed Chinese container.

In 2014 the Hydrangea was displayed in my alcove in the left to right direction. This year the bonsai was displayed from the other side presenting a right to left eye movement.

2014

2014 Display left to right eye movement

The eye movement of a bonsai is important when designing a display in an alcove or exhibit. Sometimes a left to right design is needed for the exhibit and often a right to left design is required for better balance of the entire display or exhibition.

1 HYDRANGEA SUISEKI DISPLAY

Two different companion plants of Chameleon plant, Houttuynia cordata, were selected. This herbaceous perennial is invasive and can easily take over a garden. In Asia the Chameleon plant has medicinal uses and is also used for salads or garnish. The stems are aromatic when crushed. It requires quite a bit of water and my companion plants are always sitting in a shallow basin of water. Both plantings are in unglazed round shallow containers.

COMPANION

Two Chameleon plants, suiseki and water basin for companions

YELLOW RAFT

BROWN RAFT 2

Two different colored bamboo rafts were selected for the companion planting. The yellow bamboo seemed a bit bright and the brown raft looked better.

ROCK

A coastal stone suiseki was also used to present a cool feeling with the delicate white flowers of the Great Star Panicle hydrangea. I selected an unglazed oval water basin to contrast with the round glazed container of the bonsai. A Chinese quince burl flat slab was used to contrast with the water basin. A bamboo raft was also tried and seemed to fit the summer dispay.

SUISEKI SUISEKI 2

Next one of the Chameleon plants was removed from the container and placed on the sand in the water basin to present a different feeling of the cool foliage against the water.

SUIBAN PLANT

The Great Star Panical hydrangea tends to dry out quite quickly and it now sits in a shallow basin of water, thus the name “Hydrangea.” I’ve been watching and studying this plant waiting for the delicate white flowers to open again this season. It’s interesting that last year the Hydrangea opened on July 18th and this year on the 15th.

DISPLAY SUISEKI

Also included in my collection is a Climbing hydrangea, Hydrangea petiolaris, with exfoliating reddish bark and white flowers. This specimen is approximately three feet tall and is developing nicely as a literati style bonsai.

DISPLAY 2

When this Hydrangea display was arranged, some people did not understand or appreciate the subtle beauty of the naturalistic composition. Out of state visitors will be arriving tomorrow and I hope they take a few moments rest their eyes and think about this display in my studio.

DISPLAY 1

I enjoyed composing this Great Star Panical hydrangea display and hope others might like it as well. Enjoy this summer display in my studio alcove.

MABA 2015 Convention

1

The 2015 Mid-America Bonsai Alliance Convention (MABA) was held on July 10-12, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The event was hosted by members of the Indianapolis Bonsai Cub held at the Clarion Waterfront Hotel & Conference Center.

2

345

The exhibit was GREAT! There were 90 displays featuring 150 trees. Not too many exhibits have 150 trees, all in one room. The layout was quite good, but two of the aisles were a bit close to each other, but allowed people to pass while enjoying the beauty of the bonsai. Nobody seemed to complain because they were too busy studying the bonsai and how they were displayed. I was particularly impressed by most of the displays. Extra care was given to preparing the trees for formal display. The containers were clean; display tables polished and each bonsai had a companion planting. There were a great number of fine quality bonsai displayed. There were quite a number of shohin bonsai compositions too.

6 7 8 9 10

23

11 12 13

14 15

Of course there were lecture/demonstrations and workshops as well as a large sales area, but for me, the exhibit was quite outstanding. Many people who have visited other exhibitions also commented on the quality of bonsai.

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

24 25

Suthin Sukosolvisit, the featured artist for the convention spent some time judging all the bonsai in the display. It took considerable time and effort since there were so many excellent bonsai. After judging early in the morning he attended my seminar on bonsai evaluation. He needed to leave at 11am to conduct an hour exhibit critique. Then from 1 to 2 pm he had another critique, which was followed by his workshop from 2 to 5 pm. From 7 to 10 pm Suthin presented a lecture/demonstration with a large size Blue moss cypress, but it ended up considerably smaller in size. He had a busy day, but I’m sure he enjoyed it as much as his students.

SUTHIN

28

Best Deciduous Bonsai by Barbara Bogan

27

Best Evergreen Bonsai by Carl Wooldridge

29

Best Native Bonsai by Neil Delinger

26

Award of Merit by Wm. N. Valavanis

30

Best Shohin Bonsai Composition by Mel Goldstein

31

Best of Show by Wm. N. Valavanis

The convention also kept me busy on Saturday beginning at 9am to 12pm conducting a seminar on how bonsai evaluation. After an hour lunch I lead a one hour critique through the exhibit. From 2 to 5pm I taught my bonsai display seminar. After covering the theory, principles and techniques of bonsai display, participants split into three groups for creating a display. We all went into the exhibit and each of the three groups could freely take any bonsai, display table and companion planting to create their own composition. They brought all the material into the seminar room where they created some distinctive bonsai displays. I brought several companion plantings, flat slabs and a few scrolls which they could also use. Three beautiful displays were created and the entire group discussed each of them.

32 33 34

That was a long day for me, teaching from 9am to 5pm with only an hour for lunch and three McDonalds sweet teas, but I got through it and had fun. Several of the students also participated in all three of my programs as well, but they did not have or need the McDonalds sweet teas. Congratulations to the Indianapolis Bonsai Club for hosting another successful convention and to the Mid-America Bonsai Alliance for sponsoring the event for their members and guests from around the country. I look forward to the next MABA Convention.

EARLY SUMMER BONSAI DISPLAY

SMOKE TREE ALCOVE

The alcove display in my studio is periodically changed according to the season of the year, expected visitors, bonsai class instruction or other special occasions. The period of late spring and early summer is particularily colorful. Because of the severe winter, spring arrived “late” and summer came a bit early. Enjoy a few of the displays composed in early summer.

GOLDEN SMOKE TREE

SMOKE TREE

The Smoke tree, Cotinus coggygeria, is a tall shrub or small tree in the garden. It is cultivated for the unusual flower clusters which look like smoke in spring.

GREEN SMOKE

The species has green foliage and fluffy yellowish flowers, but is not widely grown.

PURPLE SMOKE PURPLE SMOKE FLOWER

The most common Smoke tree is the cultivar ‘Royal Purple’ well known for the purple foliage and pink flowers.

GOLDEN SMOKE

SMOKE TREE FLOWERS

Another unusual Smoke tree cultivar is ‘Golden Spirit’ with brilliant yellow foliage and light pink flowers. All three of these varieties have a colorful red and orange autumn color. This bonsai has only been in training for three years from a two gallon can nursery stock. Perhaps with more water and a bit of shade the foliage would have been larger and more golden, but I’ve been trying to reduce the foliage and flower size by maintaining ‘intelligent neglect.’ Both the flowers and foliage are considerably smaller than the one planted in front of our home.

BAMBOO TABLE

Since it’s the summer season the display table I selected has a carved bamboo design. Because of the bamboo design a bamboo raft for the companion planting was not suitable because it would be repetitive.

SMOKE:BAMBOO RAFT

HOSTA PLATE

An oval ceramic plate was selected for the Dwarf hosta companion planting because the Smoke tree is growing in a round container. Since the Smoke tree is in an unglazed container, a Dwarf hosta in a blue glazed container was used.

SMOKE DISPLAY

A companion planting of Black Mondo Grass was also used because of the contrasting color of the foliage with the golden leaves of the Smoke tree. But it did not look good on a bamboo raft so a wooden slab was used.

BLACK MONDO BAMBOO RAFT

BLACK MONDO SLAB

WILLOW PAINTING

The scroll featuring a bird with weeping willow branches was selected to enhance the early summer season.

BERCHEMIA

BERCHEMIA

Berchemia, Berchemia racemosa, a shrub with vining branches which are elegant. The bonsai is in full bloom now and also has a few reddish fruit which actually developed last summer.

BERCHEMIA FLOWERS

After summer flowering the yellow blossoms drop and small brown buds develop. Most people think the plant has finished flowering and the remaining brown buds are trimmed. However, leaving the brown buds on the tree, through the winter will result in plump reddish fruit next summer. So, if you prune the bonsai so it looks tidy in late summer it will fail to form fruit next year.

BERCHEMIA FLOWER

BERCHEMIA FRUIT

The Berchemia bonsai is in full bloom now and also has a few reddish fruit which actually developed last summer. The rough bark looks old and is actually. I’ve been growing this bonsai in a container for over thirty years. Perhaps it gets fatter in the ground, but I’ve never seen a large specimen. Because of the long branches it has been shaped in a rather naturalistic form, even with a crossing branch in the front, but it does not touch the trunk.

BERCHEMIA HOSTA DISPLAY

The Berchemia is displayed here with a dwarf hosta companion planting. But this is a poor selection because both containers are round and also blue glazed. So I tried a small bird figurine on a round wooden slab, so it would contrast with the rectangular display table for the Berchemia.

 

BERCEMIA DISPLAY

BIRD

TIGER EYE SUMAC

TIGER EYES SUMAC

The Tiger Eyes Sumac, Rhys typhina ‘Bailtiger,’ is a rather new sumac introduced a few years ago. It’s grown for the bright golden lacy foliage and red fruit. The color is quite attractive in the garden and forms a focal point next to the outdoor alcove display area. Additional information on this cultivar and how this bonsai was created can be found in this blog from August 2013. The foliage has also reduced on this plant in only two growing seasons.

SUMAC ALCOVE

HOUTINNIA

A Dwarf hosta displayed on an informal style bamboo raft was tried to contrast with the bright yellow leaves and red flowers.

HOSTA

The geometric round wooden slab, with bamboo edging was tried, but the roundish ‘root display table’ of the Tiger Eyes Sumac did not contrast enough with the round wooden slab. At the end, a hand carved  informal wooden slab of uneven lengths was selected. This unusual slab was was a gift from Marc Arpag who also carved it.

WOODEN SLAB

BIRD PAINTING

A quiet black and white scroll painting featuring two birds was selected for this display.

NATIONAL BONSAI HALL OF FAME

1

2

The National Bonsai Hall of Fame has been established to identify and honor individuals who have achieved excellence in the art of bonsai and who have contributed to the advance­ment of bonsai in the United States. The National Bonsai & Penjing Museum wants to recognize those who have dedicated their lives to bonsai in the United States and to fostering a greater appreciation for American bonsai. This recognition is presented at the annual National Bonsai Foundation reception which includes a plaque and award.

Nominees must have been a resident of the United States and have made significant contributions to the art of bonsai in the country. This is an excellent opportunity to recognize individuals who have sig­nificantly contributed to American bonsai. Nominations for induction into the National Bonsai Hall of Fame may be made by anyone in writing and can get specific informa­tion from curator Jack Sustic at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum.

Last year in 2014 the first inductee to the National Bonsai Hall of Fame was John Naka from California. The American Pavilion was named for him because of the impact he had throughout the world, especially in his native United States. Additionally both Mr. Naka and his family have donated several of his beautiful bon­sai to the Museum.

3

4

5

6

Yuji Yoshimura’s donated his Crape Myrtle bonsai his father started from a cutting over 80 years ago

At the 2015 National Bonsai Foundation Reception at the Bonsai & Penjing Museum I had the honored to announce my teacher Yuji Yoshimura as this year’s inductee into the National Bonsai Hall of Fame. Mr. Yoshimura two daughters, Yoko Said from Boston and Emi Suzuki from Tokyo along with grand daughter Sasha Said received the commemorative container award from the newly appointed arboretum director Richard Olson.

7

Toshiji Yoshimura

Yuji Yoshimura was a second generation bonsai artist who was a born in a bonsai garden where his father was apprenticing in 1921. He combined the training from his father, one of the major leaders of the Japanese bonsai and suiseki world, with his horticultural degree and his natural artistic talent to pro­mote and teach classical bonsai.

8

Yuji Yoshimrua’s Kofu-en Bonsai Garden in Tokyo

9

10

First bonsai class in September 1952

He was the first to open classes to the public in 1952 in Japan and co-authored his iconic book in 1957 which became the first authoritative bonsai book in English, now it its 40th printing. His book established the English style terminology used throughout the world today. Mr. Yoshimura wanted to spread bonsai on a wider scale. The Brooklyn Botanic Garden offered him a one year fellowship to teach bonsai in 1958. When he arrived he brought over one ton of teaching material in 22 cases including many bonsai.

13

Yuji Yoshimura teaching in California in the early 1960s

Mr. Yoshimura loved America and after his fellowship decided to immigrate in order to teach bonsai. He traveled across the country many times teaching bonsai. In 1959 he established the Yoshimura Bonsai Company which later evolved into the Yoshimura School of Bonsai in Westchester County, New York. During one of his teaching trips in California he urged the bonsai leaders to organize and this resulted in Bonsai Clubs International. Additionally, his students organized the Bonsai Society of Greater New York and they later organized the American Bonsai Society.

11

17

In 1965 Mrs. Yoshimura and his two daughters joined him in New York. He continued to teach and traveled to Australia, Hong Kong, England and India teaching classical bonsai art. In the 1980s he promoted the art of suiseki and co-authored a book on the same subject. He was a prolific author of articles, both in Japanese and English.

12

Harry Tomlinson and Yuji Yoshimura in Nottingham, England

Mr. Yoshimura’s dream “to estab­lish a place American bonsai hobbyists could give their treasures knowing their trees would be cared for and viewed for years to come” was expressed to arboretum Director, John Creech and Mr. Yoshimura’s dream did come true!

14

Dr. John Creech and Yuji Yoshimura at the National Arboretum in September 1973

To honor Mr. Yoshimura’s life­time devotion to the instruction and appreciation of bonsai the Museum named the “Educational Center for Learning” in his name.

15

16

Having studied classical bonsai and lived with Mr. Yoshimura I’ve had an insight which others have not had. He spent an extraordinary amount of time and effort preparing for his classes and demonstrations. People never knew this and most did not appreciate this effort which also took tolls on his health and family. He was extremely strict with me and once told me his father hit him with a hammer because he did not handle a camellia bonsai properly.

18

He did not have a personal bonsai collection, but would rather see his students have finer quality bonsai. Mr. Yoshimura inspired, taught and encouraged me to continue his teaching and promotion of classical bonsai.

19

Yuji Yoshimura teaching Wm. N. Valavanis how to properly use a concave pruner in September 1969

20

Yuji Yoshimura and Wm. N. Valavanis presenting a program on Evaluating Bonsai in the 1990s

Yuji Yoshimura reached the top of his field, something few accom­plish. He was a self-proclaimed per­fectionist and never compromised. Two of his favorite words I heard continuously during workshops were “impossible” and “hopeless” to describe plants brought for training by students.

21

Yuji Yoshimura, Frank Okamura and John Naka

Mr. Yoshimura broke his Japanese bond, sacrificed his family and health to promote classical bonsai. I feel fortunate to have known him for 30 years as a teacher, close friend and advisor who opened my eyes to the true beauty and understanding of classical bonsai art. Mr. Yoshimura was a true pioneer of bonsai educa­tion who will never be forgotten. His teaching was the stimulus for mak­ing bonsai as popular as it is today. I’m certain Mr. Yoshimura would be honored that a person he originally assisted to organize bonsai teaching was the recipient of the first National Bonsai Hall of Fame Award.

22

May 2015 Classical Bonsai MasterClass

1 FOREST DEMO

Today we concluded a three day Classical Bonsai MasterClass with five students from New Jersey and New York state, plus my assistant. We first discussed the topics they would like to study and selected studying classical bonsai design, wiring techniques, maple bonsai, bonsai refinement as well as bonsai display appreciation.

3 MASATERCLASS 2

Each day began with the theory and creation of the main bonsai displayed in the studio alcove as well as the counter display of smaller trees. Powerpoint programs were presented with handouts highlighting the important elements of the topics. On the first day each student went to their hotels with a 23 page Classical Bonsai Design Test comparing 50 different sets bonsai and graphic designs.

2 MASTERCLASS 1

After lunch we proceeded into the garage workshop where three more displays were shown and discussed. Finally, the rest of the afternoon was spent training each student’s personal bonsai. My small power washer to clean the bark on bonsai was demonstrated and some tried it out. Looks like they liked this tool to save considerable time cleaning with a toothbrush and sources for similar pressure washers were shared. We all had dinner and discussed bonsai species as well as growing techniques.

4FRIDAY

Tom Friday and Paul Eschman

5 TUTTLE

Paul Tuttle

The next morning we all discussed the Classical Bonsai Design Test comparisons of bonsai and graphic designs. There were no right or wrong answers, but lively comments were made on several of the images. We then spent considerable time on wiring and forest bonsai design and creation. Again my personal alcove bonsai display was explained. After lunch during the afternoon workshop, while students worked on their trees, my assistant began preparing a large established Ezo spruce forest for redesigning into a rather unusual mixed species planting. When it came time to add the European beech to the Ezo spruce forest all students gathered to discuss the techniques and new design. We all dined together in the evening and several students returned to the workshop to continue working on their bonsai.

6 SERGIO

Sergio Cuan

7 TAYLOR

Bob Taylor

8 ESCHMAN

Paul Eschman

Sunday morning began with students pairing together to create three bonsai displays in the garage workshop. They could use any of my personal bonsai along with my vast collection of display tables, scrolls and companion plants. When each group finished their displays we went into the studio to watch three Powerpoint presentations on Maple Bonsai, Creating Impressive Root Sisplays for Maple Bonsai and Refining Maple Bonsai.

11 STUDENT DISPLAYS

Three student displays

9 GINKGO DISPLAY

Ginkgo bonsai display

10 GINKGO

After explaining my Ginkgo alcove display we went out and discussed each of the three student displays. The displays were quite outstanding, looks like they listened well, plus added their own creativity. Students spent time thinking of what they wanted to express and explained their theory to everyone. I was quite impressed with the displays and the selection of display tables, companion plantings and scrolls.

12 FRIDAY:TAYLOR

Tom Friday and Bob Taylor displayed a Deshojo Japanese maple bonsai

13 SERGIO:TUTTLE

Paul Tuttle and Sergio Cuan displayed a Dwarf Austrian pine

14 ESCHMAN:ADAIR

Paul Eschman and Alan Adair displayed a Scots pine bonsai

After lunch we spent the rest of the afternoon with the final workshop. Some students worked on several trees while others concentrated on a single bonsai. Several larch, maples, pines and a large Zelkova bonsai were refined and improved.

15 SERGIO:WNV

Sergio Cuan with a Zelkova bonsai, not completely finished

16 ZELKOVA SERGIO

Nearly completed Zelkova bonsai on its way to refinement

This was an excellent group of serious students who wanted to improve their understanding of classical bonsai art as well as refine their own bonsai. Each expressed their individual opinions while respecting comments from the others. Additionally they learned and practiced bonsai display which will improve their individual displays in future club shows as well as for the next U.S. National Bonsai Exhibition.

Spring Beauty At The International Bonsai Arboretum

1

2

Spring is my favorite time of the year, and also the busiest especially if you have many deciduous bonsai. In addition to transplanting and shaping emerging buds of developed bonsai must be pinched. This requires pinching many times over several days because the buds do not open at the same time on each bonsai.
28
Joe Lentner spent many hours pinching and trimming Japanese maple bonsai
3
All of this work can not be done alone. I’m fortunate to have many good friends who volunteer to help me create and maintain bonsai as well as preparing for classes and in the garden as well. My “Monday Senior Crew” came many more days during the week this spring. Each Monday there are eight of us transplanting, pinching, wiring, pruning as well as cleaning up. Because of their dedication and hard work my bonsai and garden look pretty good now.
4
Rick Marriott preparing container
5 6
25
Paul Eschman pressure washing Hornbeam trunk before transplanting
26
Moving bonsai after transplanting
27
Watering after transplanting
Enjoy the beauty of my spring garden as well as alcove displays arranged for classes and for welcoming visitors to my garden.
7
Rough Bark Trident Maple, Acer buergerianum ‘Arakawa’
8 9
Koto Hime Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Koto Hime’
10
Koto Hime Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Koto Hime’
11 12
Robinson Bradford Pear, Pyrus calleryana ‘Robinson’
13
Deshojo Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Deshojo’
14 15
Seigen Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Seigen’
16 17
Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum
18
Kashima Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Kashima’
19 20
Butterfly Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Versicolor’
SATSUKI ALCOVE
Seiun Satsuki Azalea, Rhododendron indicum ‘Seiun’
22
23
Shishigashira Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira’
32
Koto Hime Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Koto Hime’
33
Oto Hime Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Oto Hime’
34
Katsura Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Katsura’
21
29
Spring in Rochester, New York30
YUJI WINTER
31
36
35